Thu. Jul 7th, 2022

Introduction: What is the First Stanza of “Auspex”?

The first stanza of “Auspice” is based on the religious practice known as averting or expelling evil spirits. In the poem, the speaker tries to battle an evil spirit by questioning it and getting it to answer back with a truthful response. The whole poem is one big Socratic dialogue. The speaker starts by asking the spirit of Auspex (evil eye) questions to get it to answer with a truthful response, revealing its nature. Once the truth is revealed, the speaker has the spirit leave and “abate” (calms down).
The first line of this stanza reads: “Now, who are you? Why do you haunt me?” This verse is an example of what has become known as early Greek irony. It shows how Descartes used irony in his philosophy as a method of communicating with God. Early Greek irony has been described as “the principle of contradiction that is expressive of a state or condition of being or mind, whether real or feigned.” In this case, it is the state of being haunted by the evil eye. The speaker is also trying to find out who the spirit is and why it haunts him.

what is the main idea of the first stanza of
what is the main idea of the first stanza of “auspex”?

Contextualization: A comparison between “Auspex” and “The Raven” by Edgar Allan Poe

The first stanza of “Auspice” is similar to the first stanza of “The Raven” by Edgar Allan Poe. In both poems, the speaker tries to fend off some sort of evil spirit. In “Auspice,” the speaker asks an evil spirit questions in an attempt to force it to answer back. In “The Raven,” Poe also introduces the question and answer form in his opening stanza: “Quoth the Raven, Nevermore.”
The Raven is a short poem by Edgar Allan Poe, first published in 1845. It was also available as a broadside or sheet of eight posters some time after 1845. It was generally considered his last great achievement, along with “The Tell-Tale Heart” and “The Pit and the Pendulum”.

what is the main idea of the first stanza of
what is the main idea of the first stanza of “auspex”?

Analysis of Themes in the First Stanza of “Auspex”

The speaker wants to know the evil spirit’s name, where it comes from, and what it wants. The lines in each stanza get longer and longer, suggesting that the speaker is getting more and more frustrated by the spirit’s refusal to answer his questions. In line 11, he says the spirit has “devilish power of deception.” By saying this, the speaker indicates that he has no idea what the spirit is, but that it is at least willing to trick him. In line 12, the speaker describes the spirit’s defiance as “wanton and unprincipled,” which means that he may not know what it wants, but he knows that he is in danger. However, the spirit never releases him to regain his old life. Instead, it takes “the salt of his being.” This means that its touch leaves a bitter taste on the speaker’s tongue. It also represents how it has taken away all joy from his life. He may be asking questions in order to find out how he can escape from the spirit, but by not getting answers, he is being bound closer and closer to the spirit. He is at its mercy, and the poem ends with him still trapped inside its grip.

what is the main idea of the first stanza of
what is the main idea of the first stanza of “auspex”?

Conclusion: What does the First Stanza Mean?

The speaker is trying to get the evil spirit to talk. He questions it and demands that it answer back. But the spirit refuses, speaking only in riddles. The speaker’s attempts at communication with this spirit will continue for the duration of the poem and end in failure. The speaker’s frustration at this failure is clearly shown by the tone of his voice, as well as by the direction that his questions take in each new stanza.
The poet begins by questioning the spirit, bidding it to speak clearly and directly. The speaker displays his frustration with the spirit’s silence by asking increasingly difficult questions, each one more obscure than the last. There seems to be some sort of pattern to the questions in this stanza, as each question’s answer ends with a “k” sound. This pattern continues in future stanzas as well.
The speaker is trying to get the evil spirit to talk. He questions it and demands that it answer back. But the spirit refuses, speaking only in riddles. The speaker’s attempts at communication with this spirit will continue for the duration of the poem and end in failure. The speaker’s frustration at this failure is clearly shown by the tone of his voice, as well as by the direction that his questions take in each new stanza.

what is the main idea of the first stanza of
what is the main idea of the first stanza of “auspex”?