Thu. Jul 7th, 2022

What is a Lexicon?

The Ancient Greek Lexicon Project is an on-going effort to make all words from Ancient Greek available to the web, for free and in English translation. This page contains links to all words, sorted alphabetically.
This page lists all words currently available.
Lexicons of Biblical Hebrew, Biblical Aramaic, Biblical Arabic, Syriac and Modern Hebrew are also in progress.
English only (via Google Translate). These are not translated yet:
Ancient Greek lexicons have been made for all major ancient Greek authors: Homer (Liddell & Scott) and Xenophon (Liddell & Scott) from the 8th century B.C., Hesiod (Liddell & Scott) from the 8th century B.C., Isocrates (Liddell & Scott) from the 4th century B.C., Demosthenes (Kurt von Fritz) from the 4th century B.C., Herodotus (Liddell & Scott) from the 5th century B.C., Aeschines (Liddell & Scott, 2 volumes) from the 4th century B.C. and Plato and Aristotle (Liddell & Scott, 7 volumes) from the 5th-4th century B.C.
A list of what books these lexicons cover is available in the “Shared” section at the top right of this page.

there was an old lady who swallowed a shell
there was an old lady who swallowed a shell

A Lexicon Is Not the Same as a Dictionary

A lexicon is not a dictionary. It does not offer meanings for words. A lexicon is a dictionary of Ancient Greek words with their grammatical inflections. Anyone can create a lexicon or link to ours at the following address: http://www.greektexts.com/library/lexicon/.
This is the lexicon page for Iliad 10.001-1004.
Copyright ©1998-2014 by Richard Cleary. All Rights Reserved. “A Lexicon Is Not a Dictionary” was first published on: The Internet Classics Archive, http://sunsite.unc.edu/Classics/Wright2.html in May 1998. Permission: requested and granted on April 1, 1998.
Now, a lexicon is not a dictionary because the meanings of words are not offered – that’s what a dictionary is for. The lexicon page explains how to use this lexicon for those who want to create their own translations and other uses.
This lexicon includes the following:

there was an old lady who swallowed a shell
there was an old lady who swallowed a shell

Why Do We Need a Lexicon?

A lexicon is necessary for the study of any ancient language – Latin, Greek, German, Anglo-Saxon, etc. It helps to explain the structure and meanings of words. Often a word’s meaning was different in Ancient Greek than today. Lexicons also give examples of how a word is used in Ancient Greek literature. The Ancient Greek Lexicon Project is the first one to have all words from all texts online. It also has a search-by-form feature. This means that if you type in a word in standard Greek, the form appears. It will look something like this: αγαπη. The η is the rough breathing, which is necessary to show that it is an ancient Greek word.
The Ancient Greek Lexicon project was started by Jim Ritter while he was at St. Lawrence University (2001-2002). Jim got together with other students to make a lexicon for Ancient Greek. In collaboration with Dr. Peter Pierson, the project grew and it has now published 8314 entries. Each entry includes a definition, the text(s) it appears in, and a usage example(s). It also has information about how Greek words are pronounced. The project is based on previous work by scholars that had been done before the project started.

there was an old lady who swallowed a shell
there was an old lady who swallowed a shell

What Will I Learn in My First Ever Lexical Exam?

You will learn to use the grammatical inflections of Ancient Greek, i.e., case/number, gender, tense and mood, and some conjugation. You’ll also learn a little about compounds that add meaning to nouns and verbs, as well as the article you’ve chosen (“the old lady who swallowed a shell”). This is not a test of your knowledge of Ancient Greek grammar, but rather an opportunity for you to see how much more there is to Ancient Greek than just vocabulary. You will also have time to study what few words you already know.
With all this in mind, this exam is worth spending some time on. It is important not to panic, so relax and follow the advice in this article.
“When given free time to study, a person will have more free time during the exam, since time devoted to study is never wasted.”
“Studying is not about memorization but about understanding. It’s about getting a model (a guide to grammar/vocabulary) in order to understand the sounds and rhythms of Ancient Greek better. The more you understand, the more you can apply it to other texts. The words of Homer may become a part of you.”

there was an old lady who swallowed a shell
there was an old lady who swallowed a shell

What is Cognate? And Why Should I Study Cognate? , Cognate Authoring Software , cognate authoring software free download , cognate authoring applications for android download , cognates in language files to translate from one language to another )

Cognate is a word (or more than one word) that is related to another and did not come from a common ancestor. It means words in different languages came from the same one – which was Indo-European. Cognates help you to understand and pronounce a language better, and they also let you know what the original word meant, e.g., mouse, rat, big, fat, and little all come from the same Indo-European root. Start by checking out our cognate page at: http://www.greektexts.com/library/cognate/.
What is cognate? And Why Should I Study Cognate?

there was an old lady who swallowed a shell
there was an old lady who swallowed a shell