Tue. Jul 5th, 2022

Introduction . Keats’ Use of Word Beauty to Create Romanticism

One of Keats’ most famous poems is Endymion. It was published in 1818 when Keats was 23 years old. He wrote the poem in 1817 and is written in iambic pentameter. The poem follows the story of Endymion, who, according to Roman mythology, was a shepherd doomed to sleep for eternity; his descriptions are filled with romantic images of moonlight and snow. The poem can be described as a love poem, but it is not very clear as to how the narrator is feeling towards the boy. Instead, he seems to be in despair. In the poem, Keats uses many beautiful words to describe his feelings. He uses words such as “forest” and “brilliant” so often that they seem insignificant. But in this essay I will be discussing those small details that Keats included in the poem which really make up Keats’s use of beauty.
Keats uses many different words for beauty. Some of the most common words include “forest” and “golden.” One example is in line 101 of the poem. The narrator says, “I wast in the forest and learned a glorious . . .,” meaning that he was happy. Then, the lines continue, “knowledge”, but this time it has a different meaning than it did before. The knowledge means that now he knows what is beauty. He knows that forest is beautiful because it is full of everything pretty and glowing. He also knows that forest has gold in it, meaning that it is the color of gold. Keats uses this line to show that beauty is not only what you normally think of, but it also can be anything.

keats work with the line she dwells with beauty
keats work with the line she dwells with beauty

Keats’ use of the line to create figurative imagery through unity with nature

The poem is written in two parts, the first describing how Endymion is playing his flute: “A shepherd-boy, beneath the milk-white thorn/His favorite mountain did ascend” (Endymion l. 1-2).
The second part describes how the shepherd-boy, hearing Endymion’s call, stops to listen: “Shepherd lads, whose love ‘t was here enshrined” (Endymion l. 39).

keats work with the line she dwells with beauty
keats work with the line she dwells with beauty

Keats compares himself to an artist in that he dwells in beauty and does not force society’s definition of what is beautiful upon himself

Keats’ use of the line to create figurative imagery through unity with nature and his choice of words is a significant demonstration of his ability to create poetic beauty. In this passage, Keats describes Endymion’s playing as, “So sweetly piped, the listening daisies grew/ Silent in deepest amaze” (Endymion ll. 16-17). Keats uses the word ‘amaze’ to reflect his own amazement as he contemplates beauty. The pipe has a magical effect on nature, and this is something that he clearly enjoys.
Keats also uses his imagination in a naturalistic and realistic way in this passage. He describes it as, “So sweetly piped” and uses the word ‘piped’ as a metaphor for the sound of piping. The word ‘amaze’ is another example of using the imagination to create an image that is in direct contrast to the naturalistic images he has been discussing so far. He does this through his use of “tooth-chattering” (Endymion ll. 16-17).
Keats’ use of figurative language, nature imagery and metaphor in this passage are all direct evidence that Keats is making a conscious effort to emulate classic authors such as Homer and Shakespeare. By using these methods, Keats can achieve a poetry that is more accessible but still retains the high standards of poetry. In creating this, he demonstrates that he has taken a lesson from them and used their own techniques to create something beautiful.

keats work with the line she dwells with beauty
keats work with the line she dwells with beauty

Conclusion . How Keats Enacts Virtue Through Vulgarity and What We Can Learn From Him Today

Keats was a Romantic poet and his poetry reflects the values of that movement. His writing is often very beautiful, but he is not afraid to be vulgar sometimes. He uses this to create figurative imagery, which unites him with nature in a way that might still be considered shocking today. It is by embracing nature’s vulgarity that Keats is able to create a unity with nature in the same way that he uses the line. These images function to unite him with his subject and thus unify the poem. In this reading of Keats’ “Ode on a Grecian Urn”, Christina Vande Velde contends that Keats uses vulgarity in three ways: 1) figures of speech; 2) images; and 3) vocal qualities.

keats work with the line she dwells with beauty
keats work with the line she dwells with beauty