Thu. Jul 7th, 2022

Introduction: Why do we love our seasons? In literature, love is created naturally, while winter can be a more forced phenomenon. Here I try to show that there is more to the joys of autumn and winter than the fleeting nature of these seasons themselves.

I have written a series of articles about being in love, and more specifically about being in love with autumn and winter. In the process I have discovered that fall is a much more exciting season than summer. This came as a surprise to me for several reasons. For one thing, I grew up in Southern California where it is relatively hot all year round. I also spent several years living in New England in the winters, where it is cold and gloomy for six months. I never quite got along well with winter. In fact, I hated it so much that when one of my friends invited me to join her on a backpacking trip through Scandinavia in the winter, I turned her down.
Most people think of love at first sight as a totally out-of-the-blue thing, where your heart just starts pounding and all the blood rushes to your face. It is also a very romantic notion: the characters in novels are always falling madly in love with each other, without any pretensions of knowledge or experience. Of course, this is fiction; real life and real love are not so simple. You have to actually spend time together, date, spend vacations together, get to know each other’s families — all the boring stuff. In real life, what you see is what you get. And that’s not necessarily so exciting.
In my own case I was married to someone who didn’t appreciate fall and winter. I was a few years older than him, and he had been raised in Southern California. Fall was too hot for me, and spring was too cold for him. He preferred summer — because it was hot! So I spent the autumn being miserable, with no one to share my misery with.

everything beautiful in its time: seasons of love and loss
everything beautiful in its time: seasons of love and loss

Then why do we love them in such a way? Is it because they are different? Does it have something to do with the times of seasonality itself? Or is it simply that some things are important enough not to be experienced once only, but as a continuous cycle?

In the course of writing my articles about autumn and winter, I have begun to think about what it is that makes these seasons beautiful. What is so special and unique about them? Is it the changing leaves or the flowering trees? Is it the change of colors in nature that we see as we travel through different regions of our planet? Or is it something more subtle than anything natural on this earth? Is it the hot summer days, or is it the cold winter we are accustomed to? I have come to understand that all these things play a role, and that they can be understood in a way that ties together all our experiences of nature as lifeforms.
I’m not going to write about what it is exactly that makes autumn and winter beautiful. That’s too general. I don’t want to discuss the beauty of nature as such, but rather how we experience this beauty as human beings. So I won’t discuss seasons in general, or plants, or of natural phenomena like the sunset over a lake. Instead I want to talk about our nature as human beings and how we experience life itself through this perspective. What does the beauty of nature as a lifeform mean?

everything beautiful in its time: seasons of love and loss
everything beautiful in its time: seasons of love and loss

How does seasonal changing affect our emotional lives then? To answer these questions I have been collecting data on everyone’s emotional lives from my own experience. Would you like to know how your seasonal experiences affect you when compared with other people’s experiences throughout

I have written a series of articles about being in love, and more specifically about being in love with autumn and winter. In the process I have discovered that fall is a much more exciting season than summer. This came as a surprise to me for several reasons. For one thing, I grew up in Southern California where it is relatively hot all year round. I also spent several years living in New England in the winters, where it is cold and gloomy for six months. I never quite got along well with winter. In fact, I hated it so much that when one of my friends invited me to join her on a backpacking trip through Scandinavia in March (the month in which my grandparents had originally met), I declined her offer on the grounds that it was too cold for me to travel through Europe during the month of March.
After I had realized that being in fall was becoming more important to me than being in winter, I became curious about the way humans have conceptualized seasons since our Paleolithic ancestors migrated from Africa. How have people typically reacted to the seasons??? Why do our reactions change from culture to culture? How does being in love fit into all of this???

everything beautiful in its time: seasons of love and loss
everything beautiful in its time: seasons of love and loss