Tue. Jul 5th, 2022

the odyssey and epic poetry : understanding the heroics of homer’s world

In this introductory document on the epic poem the Odyssey, we will explore its heroic themes and their basic elements. We will see how these themes are reinforced in this lengthy poem and what Homer’s world is like.
The Odyssey is the second of two major epic poems in ancient Greek literature. Its author, Homer, was believed to have been a blind bard from the island of Chios who lived around the 8th century B.C.E.. The main characters in the poem are Odysseus and his crew; Telemachus, Odysseus’s son; and Penelope, his wife. There may have been
other hero-like characters, such as Philoetius, who had a minor role in the poem.

the odyssey and epic poetry an introduction part 1
the odyssey and epic poetry an introduction part 1

analysing mythic narrative syntax in homer’s aria

In his book Homer: The Iliad, the Odyssey, the Rhapsodies (1984), the scholar and translator of both these classical Greek poems, Richmond Lattimore says that epic poetry adds nothing to our knowledge of human morals or destiny. Rather, it is a narrative form with ‘the clear purpose of delighting and holding its audience’. Lattimore’s statements seem to be true, even though they invite us to worship Homer and his poem as a great mythical drama, with the hero as a mythical figure. This is not your ordinary play that we see perform in theatres. Neither are these epic poems conventional types of literature such as a novel or short story. Homer’s world of Odysseus is indeed different from all these things.
Homer’s poems do not add to the knowledge of human morals and its destiny, but they present itself as a great mythical drama with a hero. Homer’s greatest work, the Odyssey portrays an adventure undertaken by a man to return back home after the war. It is told in heroic fashion and is described in an epic poem.
Homer’s plot is divided into nine parts called books, each consisting of 10 stanzas in iambic tetrameters. The first and the last three books start with a long description of the journey home: the hero arrives at his house, which is then threatened by two men who want his wife. He kills them and then continues on his journey. Book two ends with the famous Sirens episode; book three ends with the Cyclops episode. These episodes are merely digression because they do not contribute to the main plot.

the odyssey and epic poetry an introduction part 1
the odyssey and epic poetry an introduction part 1

the odyssey and epic poetry : an introduction to text structure; parts 5-6

The epic poem the Odyssey consists of two parts. The first part, composed in the Ionian dialect, contains eleven Books (Books 12-22). These Books describe Odysseus’ adventures from his birth to the end of book 11 and then leave many loose ends for later books to pick up. The second part, written in Greek hexameters, is divided into 96 books (Books 23-96), and describes how Odysseus returned home after ten years of wandering. These two parts form a continuous narrative of some twenty-seven years or four generations of Odysseus.
Each part of the Odyssey is written in a different style. “Book 11” begins with an introductory speech by the blind bard Demodocus replete with myths and tales retold in his famous songs. The remaining Books begin with a summarizing statement of mythical events by Circe or Calypso or Telemachus (depending on the writer) that are not “universally accepted as historically accurate. The second half of the story, however, provides a more reliable source with which to evaluate the credibility of these legends.”

the odyssey and epic poetry an introduction part 1
the odyssey and epic poetry an introduction part 1

the odyssey and epic poetry : understanding mythic narrative syntax in homer’s aria

Unlike other epic poems in which the outcome of the story is known before it begins, Homer’s audience would not have known what was going to happen. Modern-day readers, however, can use their own knowledge of similar myths and legends to guess at plot developments. The poem can be read as a collection of stories that foreshadow the adventures to come. For example, when the hero’s father Laertes is about to die, he talks about Odysseus’ son Telemachus. Echoing the mythical idea of the eternal return or ‘spiral’ theme of life, Laertes says that his son will have a similar fate to his grandfather Nestor.
The main part of The Odyssey is Odysseus’ journey home to Ithaca. The story begins with a short invitation by Telemachus, before the narrative itself begins. It is not clear whether the reader is being invited to follow Odysseus, or whether this is simply a near-contemporary travelogue by a narrator who assumes his readership has already been informed of the long-past events described.
The ‘invitation’ sets the tone of the entire poem: as Telemachus says, “I know you, and I know / your goods; but I am still under / the spell of your famous name” (“Odyssey”, line 1).

the odyssey and epic poetry an introduction part 1
the odyssey and epic poetry an introduction part 1

how antonyms relate with diwali

Diwali is celebrated in India as one of the most important festivals. It is also one of the most colourful festivals, with people wearing many different kinds of clothes. The Indian people celebrate Diwali at different times, but must assemble together on this day to celebrate. The Hindu people have a long history of celebrating special days like Diwali, setting aside time throughout the year to enjoy all sorts of activities. Hinduism is one of the oldest recorded religions in India, dating back thousands of years. This religion has many different religious teachings, including many different gods, goddesses and stories. These stories may be related to the Hindu god Krishna and Diwali.
In India, Diwali is celebrated at the end of the Hindu religious calendar. This date changes each year, but always falls between Oct. and Nov. in the Western calendar. On this day the people of India light many small candles or oil lamps. One legend states that these lights represent a long row of oil lamps for those who cannot see very well or have no light at all. The Hindus may also use their lights to symbolize their knowledge of awareness and enlightenment, or dharma. However, Diwali is also a festival that celebrates the return of light and happiness to the world.

the odyssey and epic poetry an introduction part 1
the odyssey and epic poetry an introduction part 1